How to Replace Rusted GM brake lines

How to Replace Rusted GM brake lines

This is an amateur demonstration of complete brake line replacement in a GM 2000 Suburban. These older GM vehicles are prone to catastrophic brake line failure because of rusting lines, particularly in the line leading to the rear wheels. This is the second of a two part video series, with part 1 covering removal of the Electronic Brake Control Module and resoldering of the board in an effort to control an intermittent ABS warning light on the dash. Part 1 is here

Whenever you contemplate doing automotive work yourself, be sure to seek out multiple sources of information, and never trust a single source for critical details. It is always wise to consult the dealers repair manual before proceeding with home repair, and inexpensive electronic copies of these manuals are freely available from alldatadiy and mitchelldiy, etc.

Remember that compression fittings are never appropriate for brake line repairs, and it is always wise to replace an entire line rather than installing extra unions.

The information provided here is offered in good faith for free but with no guarantee of accuracy or safety. Any misadventure you encounter if you decide to accept the risk of home auto repair is your responsibility.

Music copyright details:

Bass Walker – Film Noir by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200071
Artist: http://incompetech.com/

Prelude No. 1 by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/preludes/

216
Like
Save


Comments

Curiosity says:

Yeah at first I thought stainless but then all the work to get it right. That is a chore! More protection in certain areas is required if not stainless from the factory.

South Main Auto Repair says:

Ahhhh rusty brake lines! Love at first sight for me haha

farerse says:

nice work, what a whining brake pedal 🙂

Wrench Spinner says:

I enjoyed the.video. Thanks for sharing it with us!

stuzman says:

I don't envy you on this job as it looked to be a PIA. Looks like everything is working well for you now and on to the next project 🙂

zx8401ztv says:

Well done, that looked like a right pain :-(.
Yes it was a mistake to heat the aluminium, but your mistake will stop anyone watching this video from making the same mistake, Thank You :-D.
Hopefully the computer will stop bleating about the a.b.s now.

Ozzstar says:

Nice job with the video! Great tips and tricks that many people doing the job for the first time should know. Leaking brake lines can be frustrating and dangerous!

kwd57 says:

You should consider getting a vacuum bleeder. It is very common to damage the cups in the M/C in higher mileage cars by bleeding using the brake pedal. I am glad I live in a area where rust damage like that never happens.

ManicMechanic007 says:

Well done. I hope the dash lights behave themselves now.
Brake lines are a job that most DIY guys shy away from simply because of the time and effort involved.

Kevin F says:

I wish we were neighbors and that you work for food amd/or bev. Great vid, though I was scared the end cloud scene was a "posted in memorium" RIP send off. Keep 'em coming!

TheSteelBlinds says:

Excellent video! I’m an auto technician and it seems that I always learn something new from your vids. Keep up the great work!

Write a comment

*